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Army Releases October Suicide Data

As many as 29 active-duty and reserve soldiers may have taken their own lives last month.

Department of Defense PAO

The Army released suicide data today for the month of October. Among active-duty soldiers, there were 17 potential suicides; one has been confirmed as suicide and 16 remain under investigation. For September 2011, the Army reported 16 potential suicides among active-duty soldiers. Since the release of that report, one case has been added for a total of 17 cases. Three cases have been confirmed as suicide and 14 cases remain under investigation.

During October 2011, among reserve component soldiers who were not on active duty, there were 12 potential suicides; none have been confirmed as suicide and 12 remain under investigation. For September 2011, the Army reported six potential suicides among not-on-active-duty soldiers. Since the release of that report, two cases have been added for a total of eight cases. Three cases have been confirmed as suicide and five cases remain under investigation.

Maj. Gen. David E. Quantock, director of the Army Health Promotion and Risk Reduction Task Force, knows how the tragedy of suicide affects our soldiers, civilians, and families. He joins the task force as the former commanding general of the U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center of Excellence, Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. “Our people are the Army and their health and well-being are top priorities.  This is very important work and I can assure you that the Army team is fully engaged and is totally committed to it,” said Quantock.

Soldiers and families in need of crisis assistance can contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Trained consultants are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and can be contacted by dialing 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or by visiting their website at http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org.

Army leaders can access current health promotion guidance in newly revised Army Regulation 600-63 (Health Promotion) at: http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/r600_63.pdf and Army Pamphlet 600-24 (Health Promotion, Risk Reduction and Suicide Prevention) at http://www.army.mil/usapa/epubs/pdf/p600_24.pdf. The Army’s comprehensive list of Suicide Prevention Program information is located at http://www.preventsuicide.army.mil.

Fort Stewart leaders have implemented an . Speaking to reporters in August, 3rd Infantry Division commander Maj. Gen. Robert Abrams said every soldier should keep an eye out for signs of depression in himself and his friends.

"It is personal," Abrams said. "We all, all of us soldiers -- leaders especially -- "have a responsibility to provide the best leadership and environment for our soldiers and get them the help that they need."

Eenkling November 20, 2011 at 03:53 PM
The reason WHY soldiers don't tell anybody they are depressed is because they know they will be released from the military. THEN they will REALLY have something to be depressed about...no job, no income, no housing, no food.

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