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12,073 Reasons to be Proud of the Roswell Bond Vote

Roswell has come a long way since 2000.

On Tuesday, 12,073 Roswell citizens demanded fiscal responsibility from their government.  The taxpayers of Roswell have taken a big step toward shining sunlight onto the fiscal policies of Roswell city government.

The Bond passed - Should we feel defeated?  Absolutely not.

Roswell City Government will claim this as a success - Let them. The truth is that this is an important moment for the fiscally prudent citizens of Roswell. Let me explain why. 

Sometimes you have to take a step back in history to see the full picture.  

Twelve years ago, in 2000, Roswell city government pushed through a similar bond that also passed. But at that time, only 2,273 fiscally responsible citizens were brave enough to vote against that bloated municipal budget and government debt. 

On November 6th, 2012, 12,073 fiscally responsible citizens voted against government debt, wasteful spending and over taxation. 

We have come a long way:

  • 2000 Roswell Bond: 2,273 fiscally responsible citizens voted NO.
  • 2012 Roswell Bond: 12,073 fiscally responsible citizens voted NO.

In 12 years, the taxpayers of Roswell have moved the needle from 2,273 to 12,073 fiscally responsible votes. 

As you can see, this is not the end of fiscal responsibility, it is the beginning.

On Tuesday, the citizens of Roswell began to move the needle back towards fiscal responsibility; and we expect this trend to continue. And RFFR will lead this effort by bringing truth and transparency to the voters of Roswell and fiscal accountability to Roswell city government.

Thank you for the support you have shown to RFFR. Your response to the message of fiscal responsibility has exceeded our expectations. We look forward to working with you to protect your tax dollars over the years to come.

Sincerely,

Tom Cork
President
Roswell for Fiscal Responsibility
RFFR.org
facebook.com/RoswellForFiscalResponsibility
404-586-4815 (Call/Text)

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RFFR November 12, 2012 at 08:58 PM
Councilwoman Price, It is the responsibility of Roswell City Council to set the course for the city and establish fiscal policy. But it is the duty of RFFR and every concerned citizen to question that policy when it strays from a fiscally prudent course. RFFR is not opposed to the city retaining a reasonable amount of cash above the legal minimum requirements as may be prudent and necessary to safeguard against unforeseen events. Likewise, RFFR does not oppose spending excess reserves while maintaining a balance that is fiscally prudent and satisfies the city’s minimum legal requirements. RFFR and 12,000 citizens of Roswell voiced concern in 3 main areas: 1.) Are the proposed projects necessary? 2.) What is the best way to pay for necessary projects? 3.) The city’s current rate of tax, spend and borrow is alarming Let’s take a moment discuss each issue.
RFFR November 12, 2012 at 08:59 PM
1.) Are the proposed projects needed? Mrs. Price, during the city council meeting on August 13th, you stated that a number of the items on the proposed project list are “wants and not really needs.” Moments later, you approved the bond referendum that would ask the tax payers to fund the same project list for which you expressed concern. If the projects are wants, then why does Roswell City Council need the citizens of Roswell to borrow money to pay for the projects? RFFR agreed with your initial concern and was disappointed that your vote appeared inconsistent with your concerns.
RFFR November 12, 2012 at 08:59 PM
2.) What is the best way to pay for the necessary projects? Roswell City Council asked the tax payers to borrow $14.7 million to pay for a project list filled with wants, rather than needs. However, at that time, Roswell City Government was sitting on $25.3 million in cash above the required reserves. Therefore, it is conceivable that Roswell City Government could have reduced the project list to include only those projects that were necessary and then used some of the cash above the required reserves to pay for those projects while maintaining a balance that is fiscally prudent and satisfies the city’s minimum legal requirement .
RFFR November 12, 2012 at 08:59 PM
3.) The city’s current rate of tax, spend and borrow is alarming In 2008, the city of Roswell had $55 million in cash above the required reserves. Between 2008 and 2012, Roswell City Council spent $31.5 million of the reserves leaving the city with approximately $25.3 million above the required reserves. Why ask the taxpayers to borrow $14.7 million when the city is sitting on $25.3 million of cash above the required reserves? We soon learned the answer. During the days that followed, Mayor Wood and Councilman Dippolito explained that Roswell City Council already had plans to spend much of the remaining $25.3 million of the reserves. Therefore, according to Mayor Wood and Councilman Dippolito, at its current rate of spending, Roswell City Government could not afford to pay for the proposed project list without taking out a $14.7 million mortgage on the taxpayers of Roswell. If this is true, then Roswell City Council has spent or committed almost $55 million more than it has collected in tax revenues in just 5 years! This rate of spending is alarming and unsustainable.
RFFR November 12, 2012 at 09:01 PM
What is the solution? Again, it is the responsibility of Roswell City Council to set the course for the city and establish fiscal policy. But it is the duty of RFFR and every concerned citizen to question that policy when it strays from a fiscally prudent course. In light of the evidence it is plausible that Roswell City Council could have adopted the following solution: 1. Refine and reduce the list of projects to include only those that are needed 2. Pay for the needed projects using cash above the required reserves while maintaining a balance that is fiscally prudent and satisfies the city’s minimum legal requirements. 3. Eliminate the debt tax and reduce property taxes by 25.5% for the citizens of Roswell We hope Roswell City Council will consider such a course in the future. RFFR Roswell for Fiscal Responsibility www.RFFR.org Facebook: www.facebook.com/RoswellForFiscalResponsibility

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